Rocket N1 Radio Room

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vostok-evropa-raketa-n1-radiorubka-2426-225a270

$435

Vostok Europe Rocket N1 Radio Room 2426/225A270

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vostok-evropa-raketa-n1-radiorubka-2426-225a271

$435

Vostok Europe Rocket N1 Radio Room 2426/225A271

Buy
vostok-evropa-raketa-n1-radiorubka-2426-225c269

$485

Vostok Europe Rocket N1 Radio Room 2426-225C269

Buy
vostok-evropa-raketa-n1-radiorubka-2426-225d267

$485

Vostok Europe Rocket N1 Radio Room 2426/225D267

Buy
vostok-evropa-raketa-n1-radiorubka-2426-225d268

$485

Vostok Europe Rocket N1 2426-225D268

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The watch was issued to the 100th anniversary of the Radio Room Law, adopted in 1912. This law saved the lives of thousands of people.

There are two red sectors in the radio room on all ships – from 15 to 18 minutes and from 45 to 48 minutes of each hour. These time slots are intended only for transmitting and receiving distress signals. During these minutes, there is universal radio silence on air. This is necessary so that even in areas with a high density of radio communications, the weakest signals can be heard from a ship in distress.

It is a limited edition series – only 500 watches. The creation of this design was inspired by the original ship clock Vostok-Radio Room, which has been used on Russian naval vessels for several decades up to this day. In honor of the 100th anniversary of the Radio Room Law, this watch really stood the test of time.

Men's and women's VOSTOK EUROPE watches are made in a beautiful style, Soviet Techno Design, and have reliable Swiss quality. You can buy  Vostok Europe Rocket N1 Radio Room right here, at our online store. The manufacturing of each watch model is associated with a certain scientific achievement in the field of Soviet aircraft-rocket-shipbuilding or the automotive industry and is dedicated to the creation of a specific aircraft, car, ship, or submarine.

N1, 11А52 Rocket is a Soviet heavy-lift launch vehicle. It was developed from the mid-1960s in SKB-1 under the direction of Sergey Korolev and Vasiliy Mishin. It was originally intended for launching a heavy (75 tons) orbital station into the near-earth orbit with the prospect of ensuring the assembly of a heavy interplanetary ship for flights to Venus and Mars. With the adoption of the belated decision on the inclusion of the USSR into the so-called ‘lunar race’ (organizing a man’s flight to the surface of the moon) and its return back, N1 was forced and became the carrier for the expeditionary L3 spacecraft in the H1-L3 complex. In 1974, the Soviet pilot-controlled lunar program was closed, and a little later, in 1976, the works on the N1 also stopped. The entire pilot-controlled lunar program, including the N1 carrier, was top-secret and became public only in 1990. The technical name N1 was derived from the Russian word meaning ‘carrier.’